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On the Interpretation of Art, Literature, and Myth

ON THE INTERPRETATION OF ART, LITERATURE AND MYTH.

(My formal training is in art criticism, and my first philosophical work was on aesthetics – and I can criticize all art from all cultures at every single period in human history in detail that is so painful you can’t imagine. If you think I’m annoyingly precise about economics, law, and logic do you think I am less so about Aesthetics?

To say one cannot obtain value from something, or one can obtain value from something, is very different from saying that all values one obtains are good, or that objectively better art and literature objectively contain better collections of objects, relations, and values. And that is to say that the consumption of inferior art, literature, and myth, represents a loss of opportunity to consume superior art, literature, and myth, and therefore superior objects, relations, and values.

Chinese art demonstrates a hatred of man and the human form. Japanese are attempts to circumvent the effeminacy of asian forms. All thier costuming is an attempt to make excuses for their lack and depth of masculine maturity. I mean their is a reason we use half naked super warriors and they use giant robot armor, or dolled-up clothing to make themselves look more substantive.

Compare it to German art where everyone has a bloody wound in him, or greek, roman, and european art that lionize the human form, the human mind, and human achievements.

The fact that we no longer produce a Howard (who was gay), a Heinlein, Johnny Quest or the first year of Star Trek, or even very good science fiction, is in fact because of the Jewish censorship in hollywood. Sure. (Whether Intentional or cultural or genetic).

We still seem to be able to get away with horror although the jewish cultural mafia is working against that also.

But the answer is what it is. I do not err. I am not ignorant. And I consider all but the certain portions of Akira and GITM unwatchable. )

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